News, Events & Information
Become an oral health therapist PDF Print E-mail

 
Help for Drugs & Alcohol PDF Print E-mail
www.yourroom.com.au - A great resource for people and families of people with drug and/or alcohol addiction.
 
Evidence of improving health in Aboriginal communities PDF Print E-mail
.Download and view PDF File
 
Is it a safe place for our kids - A guide for parents. PDF Print E-mail

Click here to download document on keeping your children safe.

 
SIGNING THE NSW HEALTH PARTNERSHIP PDF Print E-mail
Minister Leslie Williams
Minister Pru Gordon
Minister Jillian Skinner
Christine Corby
Sandra Bailey
 

Photo 2 ADDITIONAL PERSONS:
Dr Kerry Chant, NSW Health
Geri Wilson, NSW Health
Adam Stuart, NSW Health
 
THE IMPORTANCE OF STANDING PDF Print E-mail

Sitting around is bad for our health, even if we are regular exercisers. Here are some pointers for getting off your backside.

Recent research has linked sedentary behaviour (sitting or lying for long periods) with a range of conditions including obesity, type 2 diabetes, heart disease, some cancers and premature death. The negative effect seems to be related to how our bodies process fats and sugars. The enzymes required are produced when certain muscles contract during standing, ABC Health & Wellbeing reports. When we sit for too long their production slows down.

So here are some ideas to break up our hours spent sitting:

At work

  • Hold meetings with your team standing at each other’s work stations
  • Try standing while you use the phone or read emails or reports
  • Set up your rubbish bin, drawers, printer and other things you may need at a distance from your desk
  • Walk over to your workmates’ desks to talk to them
  • Set a reminder on your computer to stand up regularly
  • Drink more water during the day. You’ll be walking to the toilet more often
  • Go for a walk at lunch, even if it’s only for 10 minutes
  • Walk or ride to work
  •  Park or get off public transport a bit farther from your destination.

At home

  • Take phone calls standing up. Walk around
  • Put the remote control away
  • Do household chores such as ironing or folding clothes while watching TV
  • Embrace household chores
  • Stand while catching up on news in the paper or on your personal device
  • Walk or ride to do errands.

 
Our Health Our Way’ leads the way to good health for Aboriginal young people PDF Print E-mail

Today, NSW Kids and Families launched the ‘Our Health Our Way’ resources for Aboriginal young people. The resources explain how easy it is to access appropriate healthcare for Aboriginal young people aged 12 to 24.


Young people aged 12 to 24 years can have significant health needs which affect their health now and in the future.

“Talking to a doctor about personal issues can be embarrassing for young people. Subjects such as sex, drugs and pregnancy can be difficult to talk about but are very important to a young person’s health,” said Ms Christine Corby, a Member of the NSW Kids and Families Board and Chairperson of the Aboriginal Health and Medical Research Council of NSW.

NSW Kids and Families commissioned 33 Creative an Aboriginal media, events and communications company to produce a series of videos for Aboriginal young people. The seven ‘Our Health Our Way’ videos feature Aboriginal young people talking about their health, where to go and what’s important to know about healthcare.

In the process of developing the videos, 33 Creative and NSW Kids and Families consulted with Aboriginal young people in metropolitan and rural/regional areas of NSW to identify the key concerns Aboriginal young people have about their health and healthcare. 

“The consultations revealed young people often put off going to a doctor. At NSW Kids and Families we hope these resources will encourage young people to have regular check ups and to stay connected to health services,” said Ms Corby.

The videos address issues that are important for young people – their healthcare, their rights in healthcare, confidentiality, getting a Medicare card, finding bulk billing providers and pregnancy. They also highlight the important role played by Aboriginal Medical Services.

The videos are available on the NSW Kids and Families website and on DVD. Additional supporting resources have also been produced, including posters, brochures and lesson plans for use in schools.

To download the online version of the videos and other resources, visit www.kidsfamilies.health.nsw.gov.au (under publications ‘multimedia’). To order a hard copy of the videos and resources, please contact Youth Health and Wellbeing Team, NSW Kids and Families E: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

NSW Kids and Families is the NSW Health agency that provides statewide leadership and guidance to improve the health and wellbeing of children, young people and families in NSW. Aboriginal young people have been identified as a key priority group in Healthy, Safe and Well: A Strategic Health Plan for Children, Young People and Families 2014–24. NSW Kids and Families works in partnership with health agencies, including Aboriginal Medical Services, to implement this Plan.

Media inquiries: NSW Kids and Families

Spokesperson:

Ms Christine Corby, Board Member on NSW Kids and Families Board and Chairperson of the Aboriginal Health and Medical Research Council of NSW and CEO of Walgett Aboriginal Medical Services

 
Poche Allied Health Project Newsletter PDF Print E-mail

L to R: Tan Martin, Kylie Gwynne, Vanessa Lee, Kim Bulkeley, Michelle Lincoln, Christine Corby, OAM.

Allied Health for Aboriginal Children in Remote Communities

The POCHE Centre for Indigenous Health has funded a research project investigating the delivery of allied health services to Aboriginal children and their families in four remote communities in North Western NSW. “We know that conventional, urban models of care do not work for Aboriginal children and families in rural and remote areas.  I am optimistic that this project will discover ways of providing allied health services which are culturally competent and deliver better outcomes for kids and families.” Kylie Gwynne, Director of the POCHE centre for Indigenous Health.

The project, led by Chief Investigator Professor Michelle Lincoln will run over three years in partnership with community members and Aboriginal Controlled Community Health Organisations(ACCHOs) with approval from the Aboriginal Health and Medical Research Council (AH&MRC) ethics committee. Interviews have been conducted with over 25 local service providers interested in therapy for children and their families by Kim Bulkeley, POCHE Fellow and project manager and Tan Martin, POCHE scholar, as a first round of community consultation. Vanessa Lee, University of Sydney academic is also part of the team, bringing research and cultural expertise to the project.

Some members of the project team, (pictured above) met in Dubbo in November to collaboratively analyse interview transcripts. Christine Corby (OAM), CEO of Walgett Aboriginal Medical Service commented “This project involves Walgett, Brewarrina and Bourke ACCHO’s in all parts of the research process to understand local perspectives and develop local solutions. Children and families will get better access to therapy services and have their voices heard.”

For further information about this project contact Kim Bulkeley This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 
Des Murray Scholarship 2015 PDF Print E-mail

The Des Murray Scholarship was established by the NRHA in 2000 to recognise Des Murray’s major contribution to the rural and remote health community, and as a reminder of the man and his work. Des was for many years a key player at Commonwealth level in the development and administration of rural health policies in Australia. He then worked for the NRHA and continued to devote himself to improving health and wellbeing in rural and remote areas. Des Murray was a friend to many and much admired.

The Scholarship is awarded every second year to enable a young person from a more remote area to attend the National Rural Health Conference. In 2015 the Scholarship will cover the cost of registration, airfare and accommodation for the 13th National Rural Health Conference in Darwin, 24- 27 May.

The successful nominee will be:

  1. a younger person from a more remote area (broadly speaking, a place smaller than 7,000);

  2. a person committed to improving the health status of people in his/her region;

  3. a person who would not otherwise be able to attend the Conference; and

  4. a person who has demonstrated the ability to be an advocate for the young people of his/her

    region.

Nominees are sought from Members of Council of the NRHA and the Friends Advisory Committee, using the attached Application Form. Nominations will close on Monday 23 February 2015.


Who is Des Murray?


 

Des Murray, who passed away in June 1999, was a pioneer of public service work on rural and remote health. Des was a gentle and compassionate person who enjoyed extending a helping hand to people in country areas who devote energy and commitment to improving their own situation. Des’ calm and organised contributions to work on rural health issues stand in marked and ironic contrast to the personal turmoil and anxiety which he bore for the latter part of his life.

Des Murray had a long career in the Australian Public Service, including stints in the Department of Veterans’ Affairs in Brisbane and in a number of areas of the Commonwealth Department of Health.

In his capacity as Director of Rural Health and Workforce Support, he was a key player from the early 1990s in the establishment of the RHSET Program, of the biennial National Rural Health Conferences, the establishment and consolidation of Rural Health Training Units, the formation of the Australian Rural Health Research Institute and of a number of related initiatives. Des was also one of the key public servants involved with the National Rural Health Alliance in its formative years.

Des had a strong belief in the importance of teamwork among health professionals. Des retired from the Department in 1995. This allowed him a greater amount of time for his wife, Mary, to whom Des was extraordinarily and publicly devoted, and for his golf, reading and other family and personal pursuits.

Des began work for the National Rural Health Alliance in September 1996 and was the central person in the Alliance’s organisation and management of the 4th National Rural Health Conference. In his work in the Alliance Office Des was warm, supportive and genial. His work was characterised by an extraordinary level of care and meticulous attention to detail. The 4th Conference in Perth, February 1997, was a success due in large part to Des’ work.

He then stayed on with the Alliance and organised the National Rural Public Health Forum held in Adelaide in October 1997. Des had the ability to make those who approached the organisation feel welcome and to respond carefully and compassionately to requests for information. The Rural Public Health Forum was the first Conference of its kind in Australia and was a great success. Des enjoyed in particular the sense of being able to publicise and support a number of self-help initiatives in rural and remote areas, and to be able to celebrate the positive future that they showed was possible.

Des had a balanced but positive view of the future of rural, regional and remote areas of Australia. The Scholarship bearing his name is a reminder of his nature and of the great contribution he made. 


Guidelines DownloadDownload

Nomination Form DownloadDownload


 
Allied Health for Aboriginal Children in Remote Communities PDF Print E-mail

L to R: Tan Martin, Kylie Gwynne, Vanessa Lee, Kim Bulkeley, Michelle Lincoln, Christine Corby, OAM.

The POCHE Centre for Indigenous Health has funded a research project investigating the delivery of allied health services to Aboriginal children and their families in four remote communities in North Western NSW. “We know that conventional, urban models of care do not work for Aboriginal children and families in rural and remote areas.  I am optimistic that this project will discover ways of providing allied health services which are culturally competent and deliver better outcomes for kids and families.” Kylie Gwynne, Director of the POCHE centre for Indigenous Health.

The project, led by Chief Investigator Professor Michelle Lincoln will run over three years in partnership with community members and Aboriginal Controlled Community Health Organisations(ACCHOs) with approval from the Aboriginal Health and Medical Research Council (AH&MRC) ethics committee. Interviews have been conducted with over 25 local service providers interested in therapy for children and their families by Kim Bulkeley, POCHE Fellow and project manager and Tan Martin, POCHE scholar, as a first round of community consultation. Vanessa Lee, University of Sydney academic is also part of the team, bringing research and cultural expertise to the project.

Some members of the project team, (pictured above) met in Dubbo in November to collaboratively analyse interview transcripts. Christine Corby (OAM), CEO of Walgett Aboriginal Medical Service commented “This project involves Walgett, Brewarrina and Bourke ACCHO’s in all parts of the research process to understand local perspectives and develop local solutions. Children and families will get better access to therapy services and have their voices heard.”

For further information about this project contact Kim Bulkeley This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 
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